How to Select the Correct Dog for Your Family


Searching the correct dog can be daunting. With so many breeds and types of dogs out there, the options may seem endless. However, if you already know what you desire specifically in a dog, and you understand the features of specific dog breeds, then it will be easy for you to choose a dog. By evaluating the dog’s breed and background, as well as your house and way of life, you can assure your family includes a fun and loving canine companion in the future

Assessing your needs

  1. Think whether you can properly care for a dog
  2. Assess your lifestyle and pick a breed who matches with it
  3. Think about your family
  4. Assess your living environment
  5. Take into consideration any additional needs
  6. Make up your mind on whether you want a puppy or an adult dog
  7. Make a list of the attributes you want. 

Consider Costs

  1. Emergency Vet Care
  2. Professional Grooming
  3. Training
  4. Boarding and Travel Fees
  5. Collars, Toys, Treats, and Other Accessories

Researching Dog Breeds

  1. Determine whether you want a purebred or a mixed-breed dog
  2. Discuss with a veterinarian about dog breeds
  3. Consider Spaying and Neutering
  4. Research specific breeds
  5. Meet with selected dog breed

Getting a Dog

  1. Look for a dog in a shelter or rescue
  2. Communicate reputed breeders
  3. Visit a dog you wanted to adopt
  4. Evaluate the puppy’s personality and medical condition
  5. Look into the dog’s history
  6. Keep in mind pets Lifespan
  7. Create Pet-Friendly House
  8. Be ready for an Adjustment Period

Part One:
Assessing your needs

1. Think whether you can properly care for a dog
You have to take a honest assessment of your day-to-day routine and lifestyle to know if you can properly care for a dog at all. For example, are you or someone is in your family home often enough to care for a dog? Before deciding to adopt a dog you need to know whatever dog breeds you choose requires you to have the good time to take care of it properly, including feeding it, giving it exercise, and having enough time to spend with it.

All dogs require love and attention. Some dogs do need more attention than others, but with any dog you cannot be absent most of the time.
If you don’t have the time to spend with a dog, for instance you travel frequently for work and live alone, and then you must consider adopting a more independent pet, such as a cat.

2. Assess your lifestyle and pick a breed who matches with it
 If you decide that you can give time and care require by the dog, then your next step is to find out what type of dog will fit best to your lifestyle. There are dog breeds to fit a wide variety of lifestyles, so you just need to find out your perfect match. You need to be honest regarding your way of life and search breeds based on your needs.

Do you like outside activities or do you like to stay within the city? An active breed, such as a Labrador retriever, will do great on weekly hikes, while a toy breed, like a Chihuahua, will probably have a hard time with energetic hikes.

Do you like exercise outside regularly or are you a lounger? These are questions that you need to ask yourself honestly in order to find out a dog that will adjust easily to your lifestyle. For example, if you love to exercise and you end up with an English bulldog, who does not need or want intense exercise, then you may end up with incompatibility issues.

3. Think about your family
you have to consider the needs and personalities of members in your family while getting a dog. Discussing on what type of dog you all want, and coming to a conclusion, will make the dog’s transition into your home easier for everyone, the dog included.

Do you have children in the house? If so, be sure to choose a breed that generally gets along well with them. There are many popular breeds, such as the Labrador retriever and the golden retriever, that do wonderfully with kids. TO KNOW MORE WHAT CARE NEEDS TO BE TAKEN IF YOU HAVE KIDS IN THE FAMILY, CLICK HERE

4. Assess your living environment 
Your home ought to additionally impact your selection of dog. Are you living in a rural or in an urban area? Are you in a tiny flat or a large house? The size of your home and the space around it will define what kind of dog you should get. In general, a little elbow room is sweet for a little dog however an oversized dog needs an oversized elbow room.

For example, a Chihuahua or Yorkshire terrier may love your one bedroom flat, but larger breeds, such as boxers and Great Danes, need more space to roam.

If you have lots of room for a dog to roam, consider breeds that love to run and respond well to training, so that you can let it run but it will come back to you every time. These include good family dog breeds golden retriever and Labrador retriever and guard dogs, like the German shepherd.

If your family loves to travel, then think about what dog breeds can go with you and adjust easily to new situations. Depending on the specific dog, good family dog breeds, such as the Labrador retriever, generally enjoy the outdoors, being with its family, and can adjust rather well to new environments.

5. Take into consideration any additional needs 

There are a number of reasons you may want to get a dog and you may have specific things you need it to do. These need to be taken into account when choosing on a type of dog. For example, do you need a dog that can guard or watch? Do you want to train it to do some specific tasks? Do you want it to play fetch or retrieve? If these are strong needs when it comes to a dog, be sure to take them into consideration while getting a dog.

Don’t just think that any dog will fulfill your specific needs. For example considering that all dogs can be guard dogs is simply setting yourself, and your new dog, up for Failure.

6.  Make up your mind on whether you want a puppy or an adult dog
There are pros and cons of both. If you adopt a puppy, you will have to care for it when it is very young, which is a lot of work. However, you will be able to mold it and train it into the dog you desire. If you adopt an adult dog, you will have an already developed friend that is less likely to have the accidents a puppy would. However, you may be able to mold it and train it into the dog you want.

Here I want to specially mention that many wonderful puppies and adult dogs have been ditched or given up to animal shelters or breed rescue groups. Adopting a pet from these sources may mean saving a life.

7. Make a list of the attributes you want. 

After you have evaluated your needs and the limitations of your lifestyle and living  situations you should make a list of all of these variables. This list should include a blend of needs and desires, desires being things you want but don’t have to have, such as the color of dog you like but don’t need for instance.

This list will help you to choose breed that will actually right for you while looking through images of a wide variety of cute and cuddly faces. If you stick to the list, you are less likely to talk yourself into adopting a dog that is super cute but very wrong for you.

You can select a dog that encompasses a temperament that’s like yours or an entire opposite! Either way you are bound to have fun with your dog.

Part two:

Consider Costs

If you want to know more in details about dog cost, dog cost budgeting Tips, dog diet cost, vet bill cost, general cost etc., CLICK HERE

Part Three:
Researching Dog Breeds

1. Determine whether you want a purebred or a mixed-breed dog

If you intend to show or breed your dog, then choose a purebred. If not, keep in mind that mixed-breed dogs can be just as loyal and lovable, but often have fewer genetic diseases and abnormalities than purebred dogs.

Deciding between a purebred and a mixed-breed dog will help you to direct your research, as the personalities of mixed-breed dogs are harder to judge.

2. Discuss with a veterinarian about dog breeds. 
A veterinarian can provide useful information on a various breed’s behaviors and temperaments, as well as potential medical issues. A veterinarian views is apt to be less biased than that of a breeder, who is trying to sell a particular breed.

This discussion is easiest if you have already established a relationship with a vet’s, for instance if you took a past pet to a specific vet. However, you should feel free to contact a vet’s cold and ask them whether they would be willing to discuss the choice with you. Then, if they end up giving you good opinion, you should consider having them as the veterinarian for your new dog.

3. Consider Spaying and Neutering

Spaying & neutering can normally be done as early as 8 weeks of age. Generally, the neutering process is done around 4 to 6 months; enough time before the pets has reached the age of reproduction. Some parents choose not to base on the feeling that the pet will lose its sense of identity or that the pet will lose its ability to be protective.  These reasons are not based on fact.
The best thing you can do for your dog’s health is to have him or her neutered. Yes, neutering does reduce aggressiveness in most cases. Your female pet will not feel less-than for not giving birth. On the other hand It would be bad for her to have her babies taken from her than to have never given birth at all. She will even be less susceptible to cancer of the mammies and ovaries. Ask your vet for their advice.

4. Research specific breeds
 supplement the advice you receive from a veterinarian with further research about various breeds. For a summary of breed characteristics, search the websites of dog org and dog experts, trainers or check the pet section of your local library. Once you have selected the breeds, then you can look at the websites of specialty dog org and contact them in order to get more information. 
Talking to other dog owners can also provide additional information.

5. Meet with selected dog breed

Spend time with the dog breed you select before adopting your own. Use Facebook or other social media platforms to see if any of your friends own one, or find owners of the breed in your locality and then meet up at a dog park or different location to get together with the dog.
Discuss the advantage and disadvantage of the breed with an owner so you get a realistic understanding of what life with that breed on a day to day basis is really like.

This is a best way to find out what type variety exists within a given type of dog, as far as energy, size, personality, appearance, etc.

Part Fourth:
Getting a Dog

1. Look for a dog in a shelter or rescue

Now that you have decided on which breed you want to adopt, look at the websites of your local shelter and rescues or visit them to see if there are any dogs that fit the requirements. You may simply notice a mixed-breed dog that’s a mixture of many breeds that you may simply considering.

If you see a dog in a rescue or shelter that is of an unidentified breed, but you think it may be a dog that you have researched, then discuss it with the concerned persons at the rescue or shelter. They may have a lot of info on the dog which will assist you to sight its breed.

2. Communicate reputed breeders

 If you are set on getting a purebred dog, and you haven’t been able to find the correct one at a rescue center, you must find a reputable breeder. Begin the search by looking for a list of reputable breeders on the websites, pet shops of specialty dog groups in your locality.

You will know if a breeder is reputable or not by below points:
They produce a limited number of litters a year.
They do health test of parents.
They have a health guarantee for the puppies.
They provide you with medical records for the puppies including vaccinations.
They might ask you to return the puppy if you can’t keep it to ensure it doesn’t end up in a shelter.

If you know anyone with the breed that you want, ask them where they got their dog and if they are happy with the service and experience. This could be a great lead to find a great breeder.

3. Visit a dog you wanted to adopt

If you communicate a breeder and they have a potential dog which you are looking for, don’t adopt a dog sight unseen. You need to visit with the dog, feasibly few times, in order to find out whether the dog is correct for you. While visiting the dog you can assess its features and personality, as well as finding the conditions it was raised in.

If a breeder won’t let you visit its breeding facilities, it is a sign that they are doing something unethical or irrational. Most ethical breeders will be happy to show off their breeding facilities to possible adoptees.

4. Evaluate the puppy’s personality and medical condition
 it’s important to be able to spot a healthy and happy dog or puppy that is correct for you. Assess its personality to make sure it appears happy, inquisitive, lovable and friendly, meaning not aggressive or overly shy. You can do this by engaging with the dog and judging whether it is interested in you and in its litter mates.

Look over the dog’s ears, nose, coats, eyes, and general physical status. Look for signs of sickness, such as a persistent cough or runny nose in addition, compare its weight, size and general look to its litter mates to gauge its general health.

Also, in general, it’s a nice idea to pick a puppy or dog that is not the smallest or the biggest of the litter and don’t get the last dog left from a litter, as the best dogs normally go first.

5. Look into the dog’s history

 Ask the breeder or seller to tell you about particular personality traits or habits the dog shows. If they are an ethical breeder, and thus have had close personal contact with the dog, then they should be able to answer these questions easily.

Also ask the seller about the parents of the puppies when visiting a purebred litter. Be sure that every parent belongs to a wholly totally different family and has been screened for common genetic or inheriting diseases.

If all this checks out, you just need to decide whether that particular dog is correct for you.

6. Keep in mind pets Lifespan

The average life expectancy of a dog can be 10 to 15 years but it can vary from dog to dog as well as from breed to breed. Some breeds usually live longer than other breeds. While some breeds have a comparatively shorter lifespan. Just like humans, nobody can predict however long a dog will live.

In addition to breed type, a safe and clean living environment, good health, preventive care, regular wellness exams, proper diet and nutrition, enough of clean water, and how much activity your dog enjoys each day all of these plays a role in their longevity and health. Even a dog’s gender can also play a role in dog’s life expectancy too, believe it or not.

As now as you know dogs have average lifespan of around 10 to 15 years depending upon above factors you have think do you have any planned future changes which may affect your pet. For example, shifting of area and all. It’s better to think before adopting rather ending up putting your dog back to shelter.

7. Make Your Home Pet-Friendly

Did you know that something as simple as chewing gum can be dangerous for puppies or that ibuprofen is poisonous to cats? It is highly crucial to go through your house now, before you bring a new dog home, to search out risk and get them out of the way or out of the house. This includes shelves at pet level, bottles of chemical on the floor, small toys, curtain cords and electric cords. And even it doesn’t stop there. You will also need to check your house and backyard for poisonous plants for pets, and if you carry a bag or purse, you will need to search and throw away any possible dangers – like sugar-free gum, which often contains xylitol.

8. Be ready for an Adjustment Period

If it’s a puppy you’ll be adopting into your house, be ready for crying. Yes, just as with our babies, puppies cry during the night in their first days in their new house. But unlike our babies, it is not a good idea to take your baby dog to your bed to ease him. The best thing you can do before bringing the puppy home introduce space with a comfortable bed, or a kennel that can be closed, keeping your puppy secure from roaming. Selecting the spot that will be your puppy’s’ stable spot. During the day, let your puppy have free but supervised privilege to roam around the home to smell everything. This will also be a good idea to spot any hazards you might have missed on the first go ‘round.